Max Fleet

Police to help greyhound racing investigation

AN extra four police officers have been assigned to help investigate the animal cruelty scandal that has rocked Queensland's greyhound racing industry.

The controversy was among many topics mentioned at the new government's first Cabinet meeting yesterday, after it was revealed last week greyhound trainers were using live bait, including possums, piglets and rabbits, to train their racing dogs.

Racing Queensland's chief integrity officer Wade Birch has been stood down pending an internal review.

But there has been no suggestion of any wrongdoing by Mr Birch.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said four police officers had been assigned to help with investigations.

"It's a very serious issue," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"It's absolutely horrific, what happened there, and we want to get to the bottom of it."

Racing Minister Bill Byrne was not contactable for comment yesterday, but Ms Palaszczuk said he updated fellow ministers at their Cabinet meeting yesterday morning before flying back to his electorate of Rockhampton, which is currently recovering from Cyclone Marcia.

"Minister Byrne will be making some further comments later on in the week," Ms Palaszczuk said,

"But as everyone can appreciate... I sent him back to Rockhampton straight after Cabinet. He needs to be on the ground responding."

Following the animal cruelty revelations on ABC's Four Corners program last week, Racing Queensland issued seven greyhound trainers with show cause notices as to why they should not be warned off Queensland racetracks for life.

It suspended 13 trainers after seeing the footage and also after a joint RSPCA and Queensland Police raid.

- APN NEWSDESK

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